Stories of Ray Bradbury

For Ray Bradbury fans… an interesting article.

“The Stories of Ray Bradbury”—a 1,112-page Everyman’s Library anthology to be published April 6, a few months ahead of its author’s 90th birthday on Aug. 22—is filled with fictional wonders. Among them: …….”  Read the full article here.

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Humor – Too Many Clichés?

(Courtesy: CartoonStock.com)

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What Is Writing Style?

We often hear of the term ‘writing style’ – the ‘writing style’ of this writer is good, but the ‘style’ of that writer is not. What is this ‘style’ that we talk about?

‘Writing style’ refers to the manner in which writers express themselves. This manner is based on the choices they make in selecting their syntactical structures, diction, and figures of speech. It is these unique and personal choices that give identity to a writer. Generally style evolves from two things – naturally over a period of time; and the choices a writer makes consciously keeping in mind the audience and the purpose of writing.

If you are a new writer and would like to develop a style of your own, keep these points in mind:

1. Read. Read voraciously and broadly. The more you read on a wide range of topics by a variety of writers, the better you’ll be able to understand what style is, and as a result, the better your own style will evolve into.

2. Write. Write as much as possible on as many topics as possible. Don’t worry about whether it’s good or bad… just write. Before long you’ll see your style evolving.

3. Choose words wisely. Select your words judiciously. Don’t try to use difficult words just to impress your readers. Trying to use difficult words just to sound intelligent only leads to their wrong use, and as a result spoiling your whole piece of writing. If you’re stuck on the right choice of words, use a good thesaurus.

4. Keep your sentences and paragraphs short. Say what you have to say clearly and precisely in as few words as possible. Writing long sentences and paragraphs can lead to writing irrelevant things and as a result moving away from your main topic.

5. Get acquainted with figures of speech. Don’t use figures of speech – like metaphors, similes, clichés, and so on – unless you know them well, and know when and how to use or not use them. Not understanding them fully, can lead to their wrong use, and as a result making your writing sound awkward.

6. Be clear. Write whatever you write with clarity and as simply and logically as possible. The important thing here is to get your point across in a way that anyone who reads it – not just a few – can easily understand it.

7. Be yourself. Try and do all the above in your own way and as naturally as possible. Any deliberate attempt can make your writing sound fake and stilted.

These points are just a guide to developing your own writing style – a style which reflects your own individual personality.

Have I mentioned all the points or do you think something else should (or should not) be done to develop a writing style?

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Common Writing Error – the Misplaced Modifier

One of the most common writing errors is the misplaced modifier. Just like the dangling participle, it not only confuses the reader but can also be quite funny because of the meaning it gives to the sentence. What exactly is a misplaced modifier?

A modifier is a word or phrase that describes something else; and, therefore, should be placed as close as possible to what it describes. Sometimes this modifier is misplaced – that is, it is not placed close enough, thus giving the sentence a different meaning, usually an illogical one.  For example:

He had a hot bowl of soup.

What is hot? The bowl? The modifier hot is placed before bowl, so it’s as if it’s modifying bowl. But what was actually meant was  –

He had a bowl of hot soup.

Another example:

The stolen man’s bag was found the next day.

Stolen man? Sounds funny doesn’t it? What the writer really meant was that the bag was stolen. So the correct way of saying this should be:

The man’s stolen bag was found the next day.

See the difference in the meaning of the sentence when the modifier ‘stolen’ was misplaced?

The most commonly misplaced modifiers are only, barely, just, nearly, and the like.  Why? Take a look at these examples:

The girl only drank milk.

The girl drank only milk.

Both these sentences are correct, but they mean two different things. The first one means that all that the girl did with milk was drink it. The second sentence means that the girl drank nothing but milk. If both the sentences are correct, then what is the problem? The problem is confusion. Confusion because very often when the writer wants to say one thing, he says the other … just by misplacing the modifier ‘only’, and it doesn’t fit into the context. When something doesn’t fit into the context as a whole, it becomes confusing.

So, what does this mean? This means that we have to be very careful in placing a modifier. We should place it as close as possible to the word (or words) it modifies.

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What Does ‘Re:’ Stand For?

Today one of my students asked me what “re:” stood for in the subject lines of e-mails (and letters).   I thought I’d write the answer here, too, since many people take it to mean something else.

“Re:” is what is written in the subject line of e-mails (and in letters) to tell the receiver what the topic of the message is. For example: ‘Re: Your article’. Most people take this “re:” to stand for ‘reference’ or ‘regarding’. The reason for this could be that both these words start with the letters ‘re’, and what follows these letters is actually referring to the topic of the message. However, this is a misconception. What “re” actually stands for is the Latin word “res”. “Re” is the ablative form of the noun “res”, which means ‘thing’ or ‘affair’. Therefore, “re” means ‘about the thing’ or ‘about the affair’.

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Writing Effective Titles for the Web

Writing titles and headlines for the web is much different than writing them for print. When readers take a print newspaper or magazine in their hands, they know what they wants to read and know that they’ll find it there. But with the web, readers generally search for articles to read or to find information.  They go to search engines to search for what they want, or to websites that have been recommended to them. They scan and skim the sources looking at all the different headlines searching for what they want, and then click on the title that they think will contain their information.

So, what does this mean? This means that your title or headline should be such that it immediately catches the attention of the searcher. In order to prevent your title from going unnoticed, just follow these simple rules. They will make your content more visible on the web:

1. Keep your title short. The ideal length is between three to six words, and never more than ten.  This is because most search engines usually pick only a few sets of words.

2. Keep the most relevant words in the beginning. The most relevant words should also be the keywords of your content. But be careful – don’t overstuff the title with keywords, otherwise it will not only sound irritating but will also be ignored by the search engines.

3. Make your title the “summary” of your article. In other words, the title should clearly say what your article is about. This increases the possibility of the searcher clicking on your article.

4. Be sure to keep it honest. It is very important that your title is exactly what it says. Don’t let it be just something to attract readers. If your readers are attracted by the title but find something different in your article, they’ll never return. Your reputation as a writer will be affected. This is why honesty and truthfulness is of prime importance.

It’s really not very difficult keeping these points in mind. It only takes a little care and practice. Just remember this – your title is what defines the success of your article.

What do you think – does the title of this post have all the points given above?

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Inspiring Authors

Writing tips from authors. An extremely inspiring video.

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