Writing Effective Resumes

Writing a resume can intimidate anyone. How should I start? What should I write? What points should I include? What format should I use? These are just a few of the questions that can bother anyone. But if you keep a few things in mind, you’ll see that it’s not really that daunting a task.

Employers receive hundreds of resumes, so the main thing to keep in mind is to try and make your resume stand out and grab the employer’s attention at first glance. To be able to do this, it should be visually pleasing as well as well written. There are no set rules to writing a good resume, nor are two resumes ever alike. They cannot be, because each resume is structured around a particular job. The only thing all resumes should be is that they should all be as effective as possible, because remember – a resume is supposed to be a selling tool. The more effectively it is written the better your chances of being selected. For a resume to be really effective, tailor it around the particular job that you are applying for, and address the employer’s requirements. So the more you know about the job and the employer, the better you can tailor your resume for that position.

A good resume should include all of the following:

  • Heading – includes your name, address, telephone number, and e-mail address.
  • Objective – tells the employer the sort of work you’re hoping to do. The rest should be structured around this objective.
  • Education – tells employers what you’ve learned.
  • Experience – this should be built around the employer’s requirements.
  • Skills and accomplishments – this includes special skills and accomplishments like fluency in a foreign language, proficiency in specific computer programs, leadership experience, a listing of honors and awards, activities that relate to the job, etc.

The contents given above should be written clearly keeping the following points in mind:

  • Keep it free of grammatical and spelling errors.
  • Use bullets and short sentences.
  • Use action words to make the resume stand out.
  • Highlight your strengths, especially those that the employer is looking for
  • Be positive and leave off negative and irrelevant information.
  • Be professional in tone, otherwise you won’t be taken seriously.

There are two basic types of resumes – chronological and functional.

The chronological format highlights your job titles, places of employment, and dates of tenure by presenting them as headings under which your achievements are listed. This format is used when you are staying in the same field, your work history shows growth, your current position is one you are proud of, and there are no gaps in your work history.

The functional format presents your experience under skill headings, so you can list your accomplishments by impact rather than by chronology. In this format, your work history is listed very concisely in a section separate from your achievements. This format is used when you change careers, you need to emphasize skills or experiences, your most recent position is not impressive, or your job titles don’t accurately reflect the level of responsibility you had.

Sometimes the two formats are combined to give what is called a ‘combination’ format.

Which format to use depends on your particular situation.

To get a better idea of what good and effective resumes look like, you may refer to these Sample Resumes.

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Author Philippa Gregory on Writing

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Writing Effective Titles for the Web

Writing titles and headlines for the web is much different than writing them for print. When readers take a print newspaper or magazine in their hands, they know what they wants to read and know that they’ll find it there. But with the web, readers generally search for articles to read or to find information.  They go to search engines to search for what they want, or to websites that have been recommended to them. They scan and skim the sources looking at all the different headlines searching for what they want, and then click on the title that they think will contain their information.

So, what does this mean? This means that your title or headline should be such that it immediately catches the attention of the searcher. In order to prevent your title from going unnoticed, just follow these simple rules. They will make your content more visible on the web:

1. Keep your title short. The ideal length is between three to six words, and never more than ten.  This is because most search engines usually pick only a few sets of words.

2. Keep the most relevant words in the beginning. The most relevant words should also be the keywords of your content. But be careful – don’t overstuff the title with keywords, otherwise it will not only sound irritating but will also be ignored by the search engines.

3. Make your title the “summary” of your article. In other words, the title should clearly say what your article is about. This increases the possibility of the searcher clicking on your article.

4. Be sure to keep it honest. It is very important that your title is exactly what it says. Don’t let it be just something to attract readers. If your readers are attracted by the title but find something different in your article, they’ll never return. Your reputation as a writer will be affected. This is why honesty and truthfulness is of prime importance.

It’s really not very difficult keeping these points in mind. It only takes a little care and practice. Just remember this – your title is what defines the success of your article.

What do you think – does the title of this post have all the points given above?

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Inspiring Authors

Writing tips from authors. An extremely inspiring video.

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Short Story Writing Tips by Kurt Vonnegut

Well known writer Kurt Vonnegut, who wrote some wonderful short stories, offers short story writing tips.

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Business E-mail Etiquette – 3

Business e-mails are something that almost all of us have to write some time or the other – whether we’re students, job seekers, business executives, or just about anyone else. Even stay-at-homes need to write them sometimes. How crucial well written e-mails are we have already discussed in our previous posts. The heading fields were discussed in Part 1 and the body in Part 2. Now here are some other points that have to be kept in mind in order to produce a well written and well formatted business e-mail:

1. Make it personal: A personal touch to the business e-mail always proves to be more effective. Custom the content according to the person you are writing to. In other words, keep the personal touch only as far as you know the person, don’t take it too far. Try and avoid auto replies, they’re too “mechanical”.

2. Answer swiftly: Reply to e-mails as soon as possible, within 24 hours if possible. If for some reason you cannot reply immediately, then write to them saying that you have received their e-mail and will get back to them as soon as possible.  This shows your efficiency and professionalism.

3. Keep the message thread:  It is better to hit the reply button and keep the original message rather than starting a new mail.  A person very often receives several e-mails a day and it becomes difficult to remember everything. A thread works as a reminder of what the e-mail is about.

4. Be polite: This is very important. You wouldn’t want to give the impression of being rude or disrespectful. So, be careful in the choice of words and the tone of your language. Never use all capitals, all capitals means you’re shouting.

5. Don’t use abbreviations and emoticons: The use of abbreviations and emoticons in business e-mails is considered inappropriate. Besides, you can never be sure whether the person you’re writing to understands the abbreviations or not. Same goes for emoticons, like a smiley. The recipient may wonder why it’s there, which in turn may lead to misunderstandings.

6. Avoid the use of rich text or HTML: Remember, not all e-mail clients read rich text or HTML. Also, many offices keep their e-mail settings to plain text. So, if you send them in rich text or HTML, they might not be able to read your message, or they will get it as a .txt attachment.

7. Be careful with attachments: We all know how attachments can carry viruses, so very often recipients don’t even open them. So, if you do need to send an attachment, ask the recipient first if it’s ok to send it. If an attachment is a short one, it is best to copy paste it into the e-mail body itself.

8. Use the high priority option sparingly: Use the high priority option only when your message is urgent. Its overuse will lose its function, and you may also come across as being aggressive.

9. Add disclaimers:  Disclaimers are very important. They protect you and your company from liability. So, always have disclaimers at the end of your messages.

10. Re-read before sending: Always re-read what you have written in the e-mail before sending it. Re-read through the eyes of the recipient – this not only corrects grammar, spelling and punctuation errors, but also avoids misunderstandings and inappropriate use of words or comments.

All these points may seem trivial, but go a long way in producing effective and professional e-mails, which in turn give a good impression of you as a business person.

Have I mentioned everything here, or have I missed anything? Or do you disagree with any of the given points? Please share your thoughts here so others may also benefit.

Business E-mail Etiquette – 1

Business E-mail Etiquette – 2

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Business E-mail Etiquette – 2

In the first part of Business E-mail Etiquette, we discussed the importance of well written and well formatted business e-mails. It’s these e-mails that give the first impression of you as a business person. We also mentioned that though there are no rules as such on how to write business e-mails, there are certain etiquettes that need to be followed. Last time we discussed the etiquette basics for header fields. This time we will discuss the etiquette basics for the body of the e-mail.

Etiquette basics for the body of the e-mail:

1. Salutations: How to write the salutation depends much on the situation and whether or not you know the person you are writing to. If you know the person, the salutation will be just as you would address him/her in person – ‘Dear’ followed by the first name if that’s how you address him/her, or ‘Dear’ followed by the title Mr., Mrs., Ms, or Miss and the last name. If you don’t know the person, use the normal salutation that you would in a business letter – ‘Dear’ followed by the title Mr., Mrs., Ms, or Miss and the last name. Sometimes you don’t know the name of the person you are writing to; in that case, try and find it out and use it in the salutation. If you can’t find it out, then use ‘Dear’ followed by the position/title of the person – for example, ‘Dear Principal’ or ‘Dear Manager’.

2. Give some background: Don’t assume the recipient to know why you are writing. Always start your e-mail by giving some background information.

3. Keep it concise: When you come to the actual message of the e-mail, come straight to the point and only say what you have to say. In other words, keep it brief and concise. Business persons don’t have the time to read unnecessary things, nor to scroll down looking for the information they want. So, keep your e-mail only as long as it needs to be. If your e-mail is a reply, then be sure to answer all the questions that need to be answered. If don’t do that, it will only mean more e-mails back and forth, and as a result waste of time, or even loss of the client.

4. Give proper structure and layout: Structure and layout is just as important as the content of the e-mail to show your professionalism. Keep your sentences and paragraphs short; leave blank lines in between paragraphs; if you are making points, then number them; keep your language gender neutral; and be sure to use correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Always re-read what you have written before sending your e-mail. You wouldn’t want to regret sending an e-mail with errors, would you?

5. Signatures: Sign off your email the same way as you would a business letter – ‘Yours faithfully’ if you don’t know the person you’re writing to, ‘Yours sincerely’ if you know the person, ‘Best wishes’ or ‘Best regards’ if the person is a friend. Follow this by your name. But keep your signature file short – just your name, your position/title, your company name, phone number, and website link. Sometimes e-mail addresses and mailing addresses are also given, but they are not necessary because the e-mail address is already evident in the header, and no one really uses mailing addresses anymore.

Please feel free to add anything that I may have missed here.

(Some more tips follow in Part 3 of Business E-mail Etiquette)

Business E-mail Etiquette – 1

Business E-mail Etiquette – 3

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